Feel Good Inc

Jul 21 2011

Keeping in touch

When a group of friends ate out Friday afternoon, little did they know that they were in for the surprise of a lifetime, one that left them speechless in person but hopeful that the following letter will serve the purpose of thanking a very thoughtful person:

 “Dear Phil Anthropist,

 This afternoon, a group of residents from St. Luke Lutheran Community in North Canton went out for an afternoon lunch at Longhorn Steakhouse on The Strip. After enjoying a delicious meal, great service and fine company, it only got better.

 “The waitress brought the bill, and each person handed her payment for the lunch. It took an unusual amount of time for her to return with the change.

 “What was more surprising was what she said when she finally returned. An anonymous person who had witnessed the group enjoying their outing pulled the waitress aside and generously paid for everyone’s meal. This philanthropic person asked the waitress to not reveal the good deed until he/she had left the restaurant. The waitress then proceeded to return the collected money and announced that the meals (totaling more than $200) had been paid for by a customer who wished to remain anonymous.

 “It is our hope that this kind-hearted person will read this and know how much you are appreciated. Your gesture reaches far beyond your wallet. You have reached the hearts of St. Luke residents and family staff and volunteers as well as employees of Longhorn Steakhouse.

 “We thank you for being a blessing to others (and for a wonderful lunch!).”

 The letter is signed by Robert and Madonna Schering, Phillis Moore, Odane Brittsan, Jeannette Wetzel, Dorothalee and Bob Davis, Lee Willmore and Rachel Kepplinger.

(Source: indeonline.com)

Jul 20 2011

On a recent June Wednesday, our students at Bethel Park High School were treated to an unexpected day off due to a water main break at the school. My son and his friends decided to go golfing at an area course.

After golfing, my son’s girlfriend joined the group of four boys for lunch at the Trolley Stop restaurant in Bethel Park. As the group ate their lunch, they realized a man seemed to be watching them. They actually felt a bit uneasy as this man continued to “check them out.”

When the kids finished their lunch, they asked the waitress for the bill, only to find out their bill had been paid. The waitress told them the man had paid their bill! Of course, they asked her why. She told them the man was happy to see a well-behaved and well-mannered group of young people.

Needless to say, the group really enjoyed their surprise. So to the nice man who treated my son and his friends to lunch, thanks from a mom who truly appreciated your random act of kindness.

KIM LORENZATO

Jul 19 2011

ON June 1, I checked into the Viscount Gort Hotel to attend the National Council of Women of Canada AGM when I discovered I did not have the key to open my suitcase.

After rejecting the hotel’s offer of their handyman to bust the lock or asking my family in Ottawa to courier me a key overnight, at 9 p.m. I asked for the Yellow Pages and called Brothers Lock and Safe on Wall Street. Five minutes later their technician was at the hotel and with a tiny wallet of tools. Within 10 minutes he had opened the case, much to my relief. I offered a credit card or a cheque in payment and was told simply “Enjoy your vacation!”

If the Winnipeg Tourist Bureau has a recognition program I would like to recommend that employee of Brothers who contributed so much to making my stay in your city so enjoyable. Thank you.

— Denise Mattok, Ottawa

Jul 18 2011

Good Samaritan plumbers

I was driving to work along Broadway about 8 a.m. when I had to veer to avoid an SUV taking up my lane and his, and I hit the curb.

I heard “Crunch! Boom!” and then the sound of my tire going flat as I approached the Osborne intersection. I turned onto Good Street to check out the damage and confirmed what I had heard. I had the start of a flat tire.

I slowly drive to the Thomson Funeral Home where it would be easier to change my tire. I put my hazards on and noticed passing motorists giving me dirty looks as they pulled past me.

But one truck behind me wasn’t pulling around. Instead, it turned into the funeral home lot behind me. I was calling my husband to let him know what had happened when two guys walked over from the truck.

Enter my good Samaritans: Kevin and Gord. It turned out Kevin and Gord, who are plumbers, were doing work at Thomson’s and luckily were around to assist me. They graciously changed my tire while I stood there like a damsel in distress.

"See?" Kevin exclaimed. "We aren’t just plumbers."

Lesson learned today? Plumbers are not just plumbers. They are Good Samaritans in disguise.

I offered to buy them coffee, doughnuts and sandwiches, but they declined. I intend to “pay it forward” to other strangers.

Thank you Kevin and Gord. Words cannot express how grateful I am.

— Lindsay Tranq

Jul 17 2011

Good samaratin plumbers

I was driving to work along Broadway about 8 a.m. when I had to veer to avoid an SUV taking up my lane and his, and I hit the curb.

I heard “Crunch! Boom!” and then the sound of my tire going flat as I approached the Osborne intersection. I turned onto Good Street to check out the damage and confirmed what I had heard. I had the start of a flat tire.

I slowly drive to the Thomson Funeral Home where it would be easier to change my tire. I put my hazards on and noticed passing motorists giving me dirty looks as they pulled past me.

But one truck behind me wasn’t pulling around. Instead, it turned into the funeral home lot behind me. I was calling my husband to let him know what had happened when two guys walked over from the truck.

Enter my good Samaritans: Kevin and Gord. It turned out Kevin and Gord, who are plumbers, were doing work at Thomson’s and luckily were around to assist me. They graciously changed my tire while I stood there like a damsel in distress.

"See?" Kevin exclaimed. "We aren’t just plumbers."

Lesson learned today? Plumbers are not just plumbers. They are Good Samaritans in disguise.

I offered to buy them coffee, doughnuts and sandwiches, but they declined. I intend to “pay it forward” to other strangers.

Thank you Kevin and Gord. Words cannot express how grateful I am.

Lindsey Tranq,
Winnepeg Free Press 

Jul 16 2011

Last Saturday, my family spent a leisurely afternoon and evening at Hyrum Reservoir. Some of us sat in the shade and watched the boats and swimmers out in the lake, while other family members joined in the water activities. After awhile, a Hispanic family arrived and they seated themselves at a nearby table. At one point, I absently noticed that they were spreading out plates and bowls on the table, but I didn’t pay their activities any further attention. I kept reading my book until I caught a movement out of the corner of my eye. One of the women had left the table and was approaching us with a heaping plate of food. She humbly, almost apologetically, set the plate, containing tortillas and several pieces of a most delicious-smelling type of meat in front of us, saying quietly, “We have too much. Please eat.”

We must have looked surprised, and we barely had a chance to say thank you, before she slipped away in the same unassuming way she had appeared. We were touched. I could not help but think of the countless times we had lugged excess food back home after a picnic, not even considering taking a look around to see whose day we might brighten by sharing our extras.

Most people I know would probably be (pleasantly) caught by surprise, as we were, by such a kind offering. What made this humble family appear so appealing was the impression they left with me that this, their neighborly gesture, was not a random act of kindness for them but rather a pure expression of who they are. Thank you for your example, my friends.

Christina Howell

Hyrum

Jul 15 2011

The Umbrella Angel

One Friday afternoon, I was waiting at the corner of North Negley and Stanton avenues for the 87 Friendship bus to take me home.

I arrived at the stop at 1:20. The 87 was due at 1:27. The sun was shining, but in a few minutes the sky darkened and a few drops of rain began to fall. I had no umbrella with me.

I’m thinking that if I take shelter I miss the 1:27 and would need to wait another hour for the 2:27 bus. So I stood at the stop. It was now 1:30. A monsoon burst upon me, and I was drenched from head to toe.

Through my rain-covered glasses, I saw someone approach me with a huge umbrella. She put it into my hand, crossed the street into a car and drove away. “May God bless you,” I shouted after her.

If ever that person sees me waiting for the bus at that stop, please introduce yourself. I want to thank you personally for being such a kind, considerate, unselfish human being — my “umbrella angel.” Also, I want to give you a great big hug.

Did I mention that I’m an aged senior citizen?

Anne Gordon,

Stanton Heights
Pittsburgh Post Gazette 

Jul 14 2011

To the little girl in Wegmans who ran up to me today

unebonnevivante:

And said, “Me and my mom both think you’re really pretty!” - thank you so much for making my day/week/month. I will never underestimate the kindness of strangers - or children - ever again. You’ve got some awesome karma coming your way :)

(via andreabreathes-deactivated20111)

5 notes

Jul 13 2011

A GRANDAD who needed emergency open heart surgery after collapsing in the street wants to thank the Good Samaritan who saved his life.

Alan Brette, 60, a grandad-of-two from Thornaby, was walking in the town when he collapsed and blacked out.

A man in a white Audi stopped and raised the alarm by ringing Mr Brette’s daughter who lived nearby.

Mr Brette is now desperate to track down his rescuer and thank him for coming to his aid.

Mr Brette said: “I just want to thank him in person. I probably wouldn’t be alive right now if he hadn’t have stopped and helped me. It isn’t really worth thinking about.”

Mr Brette said he was walking down Thornaby Road, near the junction with Victoria Road, when he started feeling dizzy.

He said: “I could feel myself falling. I fell on to a green electric box and anyone driving past would probably have thought I was either a drunk or that I was an engineer working on the box.

“But a man stopped. He had already driven past once but then came back as he thought I might have been in trouble. He said to me ‘are you all right mate?’

“I just said ‘no not really’ and asked him to get my phone and ring my daughter.”

Mr Brette was taken to hospital where he was told he needed a valve replacement.

He had life-saving open heart surgery and was in hospital for three weeks

Mr Brette’s wife Denise, 57, said: “If that man hadn’t have stopped it would be a whole different ball game.

“They told us at the hospital that if he had been left in that state for a while he probably wouldn’t have survived.”

Mr Brette has suffered from aortic stenosis for nine years.

He said: “I have been told before that I might need a valve replacement but there was never really any panic for it. I had never collapsed before.”

He is now recovering from the operation at home.

His daughter Kelly, 27, said: “When it happened the man who stopped, rang me and said that dad had collapsed so I rushed round to get him.

“When I got there the man waved and then left.

“We really want to thank him and tell him how grateful we all are.”

Kelly said she believes the man was aged in his thirties or forties and wore glasses.

Mr Brette also has son Alan, 24, and grandchildren Mollie, six, and Noah, five.

He added: “You read about some awful people in the paper who mug others in the street but this proves that there are some decent people about.”

Evening Gazette

(Source: gazettelive.co.uk)

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